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Month: May 2016

Stone Mountain Podiatrist

Stone Mountain Podiatrist

Foot Doctor in Stone Mountain

Stone Mountain Podiatrist
Stone Mountain Podiatrist

Hammertoe, which occurs when the middle joint of your toe bends or curls, becoming stuck in that position. At InStep Podiatry, hammertoe is just one of the various issues that we work with in treating foot problems. Our Stone Mountain podiatrist is a specialist in addressing concerns of the foot, including the toes, and ankles, too. Many times, hammertoe will lead to pain, which may hinder your ability to walk, stand, work, and go about your normal way of life. We can provide relief and help you to feel normal again.

The reason that hammertoe occurs is that excessive pressure is put upon the tendons and joints of the toe. That makes it move into that flexed position. If we dig a little deeper into the causes of hammertoe, however, we find that arthritis, genetic predisposition, and frequently ill-fitting footwear are contributing factors. This is especially true when shoes are too tight over the toe area, a situation that is often linked to high-heeled shoes. It’s largely for that reason that women get hammertoe more frequently than men do. A hammertoe may be rigid, where cannot move it at all. Or it could be flexible, with a minimal range of motion available to you. Treating foot problems will depend on which type of hammertoe you have, and our Stone Mountain podiatrist will assess your situation.

If you have a hammertoe, particularly one that is causing you a great deal of pain, call us to schedule an exam. Our Stone Mountain podiatrist will take x-rays and do a physical checkup of your foot to reach a diagnosis and then recommend the most appropriate way for treating foot problems. An orthotic placed in your shoe could be sufficient to address a flexible hammertoe. It will reduce the pressure on the toe, which should return to its normal state over time. If there is inflammation or swelling, medication might be prescribed. For severe pain, cortisone shots are sometimes recommended. For rigid hammertoe, or a flexible one that has not responded to the above methods, surgery is usually needed. This involves removing a small piece of bone and then realigning the joint.